The three-legged Death Horse and the Grave Pig

It is a popular superstition in Denmark, that under every church that is built, a living horse must be buried: the ghost of this horse is the death horse, that limps every night on three legs to the house where some one is to die. Under a few churches a living pig was buried, and the ghost of this was called the grave pig.

From the footnotes on page 360 of The Complete Illustrated Works of Hans Christian Andersen (originally published in 1889 as Stories for the Household)

Expediency

Minister, it takes time to do things ‘now‘!

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– Sir Humphrey Appleby,
in Yes Minister series 3, episode 1: “Equal Opportunities”

Not _symptoms_?!

So, what do you make of Atticus’ symptoms?
Symptoms?!
Yeah.
You didn’t tell me he had symptoms. … Oh my God; it’s back!
What’s back?
The pandemic.

– Dr. Lola Adolf Spratt and Dr. Derrick Childrens
in Childrens Hospital 7×2: One Million Saved

childrens-hospital

The World Beneath

“The only thing that will be born here will be scientific understanding. And the only thing that will die will be myth and superstition.”
“Myth will never die. It is the deepest kind of understanding.”

– Arthur Denison and Oriana Nascava,
in Dinotopia: The World Beneath, by James Gurney
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Corrupting plans

This was supposed to be a web of lies, but you’re turning it into a maze of deception!

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– Rad Cunningham,
Moonbeam City 1×10: The Wedding of Rad (Lie)

Top 10 things I plan to do in 2016

The first time around, it went splendidly. The second time, I got overly ambitious with my list of goals, and the third time around, it went quite poorly, too — though in this case, I blame spending all year on moving and remodelling.

But I find it nice to have this list to revisit — for instance, I have a notoriously shoddy memory, and seeing the dates on which I did things helps me in hindsight recalling context for what would otherwise at best be fragmented memories. So here we go again:

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Gulliver on lawyers

I said there was a society of men among us, bred up from their youth in the art of proving by words multiplied for the purpose, that white is black, and black is white, according as they are paid. […] It is a maxim among these lawyers, that whatever hath been done before may legally be done again: and therefore they take special care to record all the decisions formerly made against common justice and the general reason of mankind. These, under the name of precedents, they produce as authorities, to justify the most iniquitous opinions; and the judges never fail of decreeing accordingly.

– Excerpt from Gulliver’s explanation of the Briths legal system in “A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms”,
this being part IV in Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts.
By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships

by Jonathan Swift, 1726